Blogtrotters

Showing posts with label vocal. Show all posts
Showing posts with label vocal. Show all posts

Wednesday, December 6, 2017

Colonel Lemma Demissew - 7 songs [ethiopia]











          One of the most successful musicians of the 1970s and 80s Colonel Lemma Demissew has died at the age of 68 on Saturday, August 24th 2009. A pianist, composer, singer and arranger, Lemma was the leading musician of Armed Forces band, a band that has entertained the army and visiting heads of states for decades. Among his appreciative audiences were Fidel Castro of Cuba, Libya’s Muammar al-Qaddafi and the Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak.

        His songs such as “Astawesalehu” “Adrashas Tefabegn” and “Des Balagnalech” are still popular hits. Lemma also maintains reputation for arranging many of Mahmoud Ahmed’s and Alemayehu Eshete anthological vinyl records.







Lemma Demissew - አስታዉሳለሁ ( Astawsalehu )





          Born in Welisso in 1940, Lemma studied high school at Hailemaryam Mamo Secondary High School in Debre Birhan town and at the age of 15 joined the music section of the Armed Forces. There among other things he taught himself to play clarinet. Lemma impressed his superiors with his unique vocal style, demonstrating both outstanding range and the influences of western music. During his time in the Armed Forces, he has taken many musical courses, including a six-year-training in conducting in Soviet Union.

        Lemma has composed a number of official army songs by frequently abandoning the traditional rules and disciplines. He created new harmonies and pioneered new musical forms in which to present his musical ideas. Part of his success was the result of his mastery of the pleasant, tuneful style of piano. The single “Astawesalehu Mech Eresalehu” was his first hit and his talent for melodious, sentimental ballads became his most distinguishing feature. This music remains Lemma signature work and a favorite hit on local radio stations.

          Starting as simple soldier in 1974 he became an army commander and conductor of the roving marshal band. His advancement was rapid. His personal charm and his artistic abilities were partly responsible for his rapid advancement in the army.

       When Lemma resigned in 1993 after the army was disbanded, he was colonel. Even after that, he was much sought as a piano teacher by many, and his long list of students was a roster of the young and the old.






Lemma Demissew - ሰው መሳይ ሾካኮች  (Sew Mesay Shokakoch)





            In May 2009 when the Alliance Ethio-Francise organized the 8th Ethiopian Music Festival has chosen to honor Lemma and Sahle Dagago, another notable arranger and composer who is at present in poor health. Comparing it with Sahel Degago, Francis Falsetto described Lemma’s music as a feverish modernist, deeply inspired by the electric wave born on the other side of the Atlantic Ocean.

       Getachew Debalqe, a renowned stage personality, described Lemma as a hardworking and diligent musician. Getachew told Addis Journal that he was able visit Lemma two days before his demise. “I was lucky to be able to see him on Thursday. He didn’t say much but was able to utter some words.” Lemma had a stroke few years ago that has left him paralyzed.


            Bahata Gebrehiwot, a musician of Lemma‘s era, said Lemma was a great musician. “He has had a tremendous musical achievement yet remained very modest and reserved.” Bahta remarked though Lemma was able to lead his family autonomously, he hasn’t much of financial fortunes. “Like many other musicians, he hasn’t made much use of his music and hasn’t got the recognition he deserved,” says Bahta.





Lemma Demissew - 01 - Adrashash Tefabegn (2:52)
Lemma Demissew - 02 - Almaz enqu mesay (3:48)
Lemma Demissew - 03 - Astawesalehu (4:05)
Lemma Demissew - 04 - Konjo Lij Ayiche (4:05)
Lemma Demissew - 05 - Kulun Man Kualeshe (6:37)
Lemma Demissew - 06 - Kurtun Negerygn (2:05)
Lemma Demissew - 07 - Lezelalem Nuri (2:30)





Wednesday, November 29, 2017

Either/Orchestra - Live at Berklee [usa+eth]











Founded in 1985 by saxophonist & composer Russ Gershon, the ten-piece Either/Orchestra, based in Somerville MA, is one of the jazz world's most long-lived and distinguished groups.  Alumni include jazz stars such as John Medeski, Matt Wilson, Miguel Zenon, Jaleel Shaw & Josh Roseman.

The E/O, featuring a six piece horn section, piano, bass, drums and congas, has put its stamp on just about every style of jazz, from big band, swing and bop to Latin jazz, electric and avant-garde.  The last decade or more has found the band absorbing an Afro-Caribbean influence through a succession of Latino members.  






Teshome Mitiku with Either/Orchestra




More unusually, the E/O has become deeply involved with Ethiopian music, touring there and collaborating with many Ethiopian greats of the outstanding 1960's generation.  Mulatu Astatke, Mahmoud Ahmed and Teshome Mitiku are among the band's favorites.  The Ethiopian connection includes the double CD Ethiopíques 20: Live in Addis and the DVD Ethiogroove: Mahmoud Ahmed and Either/Orchestra.


Over the years, the E/O has been recognized with five Boston Music Awards, perennial placement in the Big Band category of the Down Beat International Critics Poll, and leader Gershon was nominated for an arranging Grammy for his composition "Bennie Moten's Weird Nightmare," included in The Calculus of Pleasure.








The E/O began performing original arrangements of Ethiopian songs, inspired by a compilation called Ethiopian Groove: the Golden 70s. In 2000, after three of these songs appeared on the album More Beautiful than Death, Francis Falceto, the producer of Ethiopian Groove, contacted Gershon and eventually arranged an invitation for the E/O to play at the Ethiopian Music Festival in Addis Ababa in 2004. 

Along with Indo-British singer Susheela Raman the same year, the E/O was the first non-Ethiopian artist to appear in the festival, and was the first US big band to appear in Ethiopia since Duke Ellington's in 1973. Their concert at the festival was recorded and ultimately appeared in Falceto's Ethiopiques series on the French Buda Musique label. Five Ethiopian guests appear on the recording: Mulatu Astatke, Getatchew Mekurya, Tsedenia Markos, Bahta Hewet and Michael Belayneh. This tour and recording have led to an ongoing collaboration with Astatke, the primary founder of Ethiopian jazz, concerts with Ethiopian expatriates singer Hana Shenkute, krar player Minale Dagnew, masinko player Setegn Atanaw, and the great Ethiopian singer Mahmoud Ahmed with whom E/O released a DVD in 2007. 

Mahmoud Ahmed and fellow legendary Ethiopian singer Alemayehu Eshete played Lincoln Center Out of Doors in 2008 backed by E/O. The group debuted a collaboration with vocalist Teshome Mitiku in the summer of 2010, including a headlining appearance at the Chicago Jazz Festival.



Either Orchestra - 01 - Introduction (3:03)
Either Orchestra - 02 - Tigrigna,Oromigna,Guragigna (14:06)
Either Orchestra - 03 - Arehibi (9:34)
Either Orchestra - 04 - Ethiopia (5:20)
Either Orchestra - 05 - Yamnaw Bedele (6:55)
Either Orchestra - 06 - Yeqir Beqa (6:07)



guests :

Minnale Danew - krar
Setegn Atanaw - masinko
Hana Shenkute - vocal



Thursday, November 16, 2017

Fereheiwot Hailemichael - Negeregn [2017] [ethiopia]
















Fereheiwot Hailemichael - Negeregn





Fereheiwot Hailemichael - 01 - Negeregn (3:48)
Fereheiwot Hailemichael - 02 - Hulum Dehna (4:20)
Fereheiwot Hailemichael - 03 - Zemaye (4:05)
Fereheiwot Hailemichael - 04 - Abebaye (3:29)
Fereheiwot Hailemichael - 05 - Tizeta (2:14)
Fereheiwot Hailemichael - 06 - Alawedaderehem (0:53)
Fereheiwot Hailemichael - 07 - Adelegne (5:53)
Fereheiwot Hailemichael - 08 - Geremegne (4:52)
Fereheiwot Hailemichael - 09 - Amen (4:04)
Fereheiwot Hailemichael - 10 - Awawale (3:28)





Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Mohammed Awel - Menzuma Nasheed [ethiopia]











             In general, Islamic anasheed do not contain lamellaphone instruments, string instruments, or wind and brass instruments, although digital remastering – either to mimic percussion instruments or create overtones – is permitted. This is because many Muslim scholars state that Islam prohibits the use of musical instruments except for some basic percussion.

         Nasheed are popular throughout the Islamic world. The material and lyrics of a nasheed usually make reference to Islamic beliefs, history, and religion, as well as current events.








Mohammed Awel [Menzuma] - Engurguro






        Nasheed (Arabic: singular نشيد nashīd, plural أناشيد anāshīd, also nashwad (pl.), meaning: "chants"; also nasyid in Malaysia and Indonesia) is a work of vocal music that is either sung acappella or accompanied by percussion instruments such as the daf. 





Mohammed Awel - 01 - Menzuma (14:57)
Mohammed Awel - 02 - Unknown (5:33)
Mohammed Awel - 03 - Ramadan Ramadan (6:04)
Mohammed Awel - 04 - Nasheeda (12:07)
Mohammed Awel - 05 - New Nasheeda (4:53)






Friday, November 10, 2017

v.a. - Ethiopian Hit Parade Volume 1 [1972] [ethiopia]












Abbèbè Tèssèmma - Ashasha bèyèw


















































Alèmayèhu Eshèté - 01 - Addis Abeba Bete (4:33)
Girma Bèyènè - 02 - Sét alamenem (5:28)
Gèmètchu Itana - 03 - Shemèrmari tiya (4:31)
Sèyfu Yohannès - 04 - Tezeta (5:21)
Abaynèh Dèdjèné - 05 - Yèbèrèha lomi (3:33)
Tèshomè Meteku - 06 - Gara ser nèw bétesh (3:15)
Menelik Wèsnatchèw - 07 - Asha gèdawo (4:26)
Muluqèn Mèllèssè - 08 - Hédètch Alu (5:17)
Mulatu Astatqé - 09 - Yèkèrmo Sèw (4:15)
Essatu Tèssèmma - 10 - Ayamaru Eshèté (4:00)
Abbèbè Tèssèmma - 11 - Ashasha bèyèw (3:35)






Friday, October 27, 2017

Wayna - The Expats [2013] [usa-ethiopia]




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       It has been said that Ethiopian-born, singer/songwriter Wayna possesses a voice that is as sweet and pure as it is honest and passionate. This young talent’s love for music started as a child, when she starred in theater productions like “Annie,” and “Damn Yankees” and toured with a children’s musical review company. Wayna went on to hone her vocal talents as a young adult by absorbing the works of her favorite artists, including Minnie Riperton, Billie Holiday, Stevie Wonder, and Donny Hathaway.






Wayna - Daydream





       While in college, Wayna was crowned Miss Black Unity of the University of Maryland in 1995, earning a one year tuition scholarship and special honors for “Best Talent” and “Best Response to Question” at the 17th annual pageant. The following year, she founded a gospel quartet and performed with the group at the World Famous Apollo Theater in Harlem, NY, where they placed as finalists in the Amateur Night competition. She traveled with the critically acclaimed University of Maryland Gospel Choir and regularly performed at churches and gospel showcases throughout the East coast.






           After earning a Bachelor’s degree with a double major in English and Speech Communication from the University of Maryland, Wayna began her professional career as a Writer in the White House for the Clinton administration. But soon, the pull to realize her dream as a recording artist would prove too great. She left to concentrate on her music full-time. 

    Since then, Wayna has collaborated with legendary studio icon/producer Bill Laswell, with critically and comercially hailed producer Eran Tabib, Jive Records producer, Veit Renn, and former Touch of Jazz standout, Kev Brown. She is a featured vocalist/co-writer on on the Sly and Robbie album, Version Born released by Palm Pictures and also featuring contributions from Killah Priest, Black Thought, and N’dea Davenport. She’s also served as a featured vocalist and writer on a number of independent projects for artists, including W. Ellington Felton, Kenn Starr, Kev Brown, Cy Young, and Tamara Wellons.











       Unlike Wayna's jazzy neo-soul albums Moments of Clarity, Book 1 and Higher Ground (which earned her a Grammy nod for "Lovin You (Music)"), her latest release, The Expats, explores the Ethiopian-born singer-songwriter's desire to sonically travel, employing greater world beat influences while drawing on unexpected sides of her voice. 

     Standout opening track "Yo Yo" shows off her dreamy melodic vocals against African beats, revealing that although she's labeled a progressive R&B artist, she would shine in more rock-based genres, too; on the theatrical "Freak Show," her crazy range soars to operatic levels. There are moments where Wayna's flawlessly executed vocals sound strident, making one miss the sultry soul she showcased on previous releases, like "I Don't Want to Wait," a track on which uncooperative production aims itself in too many directions, ultimately working against itself. Overall, Wayna has an innate ability to enrich each song with atmosphere, making The Expats a sweeping global affair: the songs take you to the Sahara desert ("Echo") and the lush plains of Jamaica ("Amazing"), all the while bringing something to music that is too special to ignore.





01. Wayna - Yo Yo (5:44)
02. Wayna - Time Will Come (feat. Emperor Haile Selassie) (4:44)
03. Wayna - Echo (4:28)
04. Wayna - Amazing (4:01)
05. Wayna - I Don't Wanna Wait (4:25)
06. Wayna - Freak Show Intro (feat. Chris Rouse) (0:43)
07. Wayna - Freak Show (4:25)
08. Wayna - Long as You Know (feat. Setgn Satenaw) (5:17)
09. Wayna - Send It Away (feat. Frederic Yonnet) (4:42)
10. Wayna - Holy Heathen (feat. Naz Tana) (6:00)




Thursday, October 26, 2017

Asnakech Worku & Alemu Aga - Ende Jerusalem [1996] [ethiopia]


                   

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Asnakech Worku or Asnaqètch Wèrqu: Krar player and poet


       Asnaqetch Werqu was born an orphan who went on to become the first actress to appear on the Ethiopian stage. However, her musical talent garnered her attention that outshone her acting career in the National Theatre. Reportedly, she initially worked as an actress and dancer in the Haile Sellassie I theatre troupe and was actually the first woman to be part of this troupe. At an early age Asnaqetch taught herself to play the krar and eventually went on to become famous as a master of the krar (lyre) and a singer who was considered to be the last great storyteller to engage in the tradition of poetic jousting, following in the traditions of the Azmaris or artist caste.







       A five (sometimes six) stringed lyre with a gut resonator, the krar was an ancient Ethiopian instrument frequently used by the Azmari or musician class. It has been said the the Japanese koto has a sound similar to that the krar. Azmari, can be male or female, and are skilled at singing spontaneous verses while playing the krar or masenqo (one-stringed fiddle). They play in drinking establishments known as 'tejbeit' that serve 'tej' (honey mead). They are also often invited to perform at private parties where they would improvise lyrics based on a theme suggested by the host. This poetic jousting not only relies improvisation but the art of poignant verses, wit, imagery and sarcastic puns.








       Following Haile Selaissie's removal from office by the Derg in 1974, artists in Ethiopia were often forced underground to perform or had to attempt to create their music in a very hostile environment. This repressive regime slaughtered hundreds of thousands and fuelled subsequent unrest. Nevertheless a brief period of artistic freedom existed in the 70's between Selaissie's imperial rule and the military junta of the Derg.





Asnakech Worku




       The French label Buda Musique, was able to select 22 songs to compile an album for Volume 16 of the acclaimed Ethiopiques series - named The Lady With The Krar. These songs were chosen from two LPs recorded in 1974 and 1976. Buda Musique acquired them from their previously-acquired Kaifa Records archive (1973-77). Apparently, the first 12 songs on this album were released during the beginning of the revolutionary disorder and were banned almost immediately afterwards, as many records were simply taken off of store shelves. It didn't help that the krar was often regarded as a 'devil's instrument' by certain segments of the population.









       Werqu's verses evoke epic tales and her love ballads are tinged with longing and melancholy. Surprisingly, during her time as an musician and actress, artists in general were frowned upon, and this was especially true for female ones. This contributed to many hardships and suffering in Werqu's life, which she often expressed in her music, as she recorded her struggles against the conventions of established society. Ironically enough, it is from the depths of this emotional angst that we see the emergence of a profound spiritual beauty that resonates with her 'serenely-emotional' vocals as they meld with the hypnotic melodies of the krar.




Alemu Aga

       (born 1950) is an Ethiopian musician and singer, a master of the bèguèna.
Born in Entotta, near Addis Ababa, Alemu became interested in the begena (a ten-stringed member of the lute family, also known as "King David's Harp") at the age of twelve, when a master of the instrument moved in next door to his family, the Aleqa Tessema Welde-Emmanuel. Aleqa Tessema began teaching at Ras Desta school, where Alemu was a pupil. As well as studying the begena at school, Alemu carried his master's instrument to and from school, and thus benefited from more of Tessema's time.











       He went on to study geography at Addis Ababa University, and after graduation went to work as a geography teacher at the Yared Music School, where for seven years he also taught begena. Alemu went on to become an acknowledged master of the instrument, first recorded in 1972 by Cynthia Tse Kimberlin for a major UNESCO collection, and performing and broadcasting around the world. In 1974, however, the Derg military junta came to power in Ethiopia; their anti-religious policies also included the banning of the begena from radio broadcasts, and the closing down of the Yared School's teaching of the instrument. As a result, Alemu Aga decided to give up his teaching post in 1980, and opened a souvenir shop in Addis Ababa's Piazza district.
For a time he played only in private, but the collapse of the Derg's régime led eventually to a change in state policy, and Alemu again began to teach and perform in public.
















01. Asnakech Worku/Alemu Aga - Tizita (7:40)
02. Asnakech Worku/Alemu Aga - Arada (5:27)
03. Asnakech Worku/Alemu Aga - Ende Jerusalem (6:59)
04. Asnakech Worku/Alemu Aga - Mela Mela (6:18)
05. Asnakech Worku/Alemu Aga - Wogene (4:31)
06. Asnakech Worku/Alemu Aga - Abet Abet (6:30)
07. Asnakech Worku/Alemu Aga - Besmeab (12:39)
08. Asnakech Worku/Alemu Aga - Wanen (3:52)
09. Asnakech Worku/Alemu Aga - Yibelahala (3:04)
10. Asnakech Worku/Alemu Aga - Alayenim Belu (3:49)
11. Asnakech Worku/Alemu Aga - Girf (0:56)
12. Asnakech Worku/Alemu Aga - Selamta (12:30)








Tuesday, October 24, 2017

Saba - Jidka [The Line] [2007] [ethiopia]




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               Saba Anglana, singer and songwriter, was born in Mogadishu, capital of Somalia, to an Ethiopian mother (born in Somalia) and Italian father. After doing much of her growing up in Italy, Saba studied to become a mosaicist, completing a degree in Art History at the University of Rome La Sapienza. She worked in the communication and publishing industry and, as actress, for TV and theatre.






Saba - Jidka 





       Due to the family's mixed-marriage status (Saba's father was Italian, and her mother a Somalia-born Ethiopian), the Anglana were forced to flee to the father's homeland when Saba was five years old. Anglana was thereafter raised in Italy, eventually rising to national prominence as a television actress, but her Somali roots remained an important focus. She studied the native language with her mother, particularly the regional dialect of Xamar Weyne, and connected to her native country through music.







       The word 'Jidka', which is the title track, means line – the line that runs on her belly and divides it into two parts – a darker side and a lighter one. This for her represents the union of diversities and the harmony that her parents found when they fell in love. Her story focuses on her identity as multilayered and with many different influences. She sings in her mother tongue – a type of Somali that is spoken in Reer Xamar, a quarter of Mogadishu, and has real expression and rhythm in itself. The result is an album which is a real mix of contemporary and traditional.








       On 'Jidka' (The Line), her musical debut, she explores the divide between Somalia and Italy with a rare sensitivity and gentle humour; mixing acoustic guitars and koras with traditional African beats and contemporary percussion. The result reflects both one woman's search for her identity and what it means to be





01. Saba - I Sogni (3:00)
02. Saba - Hoio (3:49)
03. Saba - Hanfarkaan (3:06)
04. Saba - Jidka (3:15)
05. Saba - La Temps Passe (3:58)
06. Saba - Manta (4:30)
07. Saba - Yenne Yenne (3:32)
08. Saba - Furah (4:34)
09. Saba - Je Suis Petite (3:10)
10. Saba - Boqoroda Meskin (3:15)
11. Saba - Melissa (4:07)
12. Saba - Huwaiahuwa (1:41)



Sunday, October 15, 2017

Woubeshet Feseha / Wubshet Fisseha - unknown album [1984] [ethiopia]





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       Great ethiopian groove !!! 

     1976 is the release date in the Ethiopian calendar; that makes it 1984 in the Gregorian calendar.