Blogtrotters

Showing posts with label oldies. Show all posts
Showing posts with label oldies. Show all posts

Thursday, February 15, 2018

Aster Aweke - Chereka [2017] [ethiopia]













Aster Aweke - Ayachihut Wey





Aster Aweke - 01 - Bemelke Atiwdedegn (6:02)
Aster Aweke - 02 - Tsebayih New (6:16)
Aster Aweke - 03 - Fikir Yemiabibew (8:20)
Aster Aweke - 04 - Yehanger Tizita (4:27)
Aster Aweke - 05 - Chereka Wubetish (5:26)
Aster Aweke - 06 - Ayachihut Wey (5:26)
Aster Aweke - 07 - Shirr-Shirr (6:32)
Aster Aweke - 08 - Goobi Ayinama (4:53)
Aster Aweke - 09 - Fikir New Habtachin (7:01)




Wednesday, January 24, 2018

v.a. - [2018] - Ethiopian Popular and Folk Music (Bezunesh, Tlahoun, Bahta Gebrehiwot, Menelik Wessanechew) [ethiopia]





This post is completely taken from extraordinary new blog dedicated to an older african music. 

My true admiration goes to Matthew Lavoie, the author. 

You may find his blog here >>> WALLAHI LE ZEIN! 








Menelik Wossenachew




Here is another reel of radio recordings from the horn of Africa.  This reel was compiled by Ato Girma Zande, the music librarian of Radio Ethiopia back in the late 1960s (my guess is 1966-67).  As you have surely read in the Ethiopiques liner notes (essential reading on Ethiopian music), the 1960s were a decade of musical ferment in Ethiopia.  A decade of musical innovation and flux, foreshadowing the prolific early 1970s, the 'Golden Era' of Ethiopian popular music that has become a musical benchmark--akin to 1930s Harlem or 1980s Kingston--known to music lovers throughout the world. 


This reel features five tracks by Bezunesh Bekele, including a 'traditional' version of 'Ere Mela Mela' as well as a live recording, three short and wonderful tracks by Bahta Gebrehiwot, three by Tilahoun Gessesse, the greatest Ethiopian singer of the Golden Age, and four lovely cuts by Menelik Wessenachew.  These singers are accompanied by the great orchestras of the decade, the Ras Band, the Imperial Bodyguard Orchestra and the Haile Selassie Orchestra.  The reel starts with four tracks of 'traditional' music, featuring, in particular, two lovely songs from Tigre and Shoa province.






Bezunesh Bekele - Hizb le Hizb





I recorded these tracks straight from the master reel to CD.  This is an old reel and some of the tracks are a little wobbly.  I have left the tracks in the order that Ato Zande dubbed them and I have not fiddled with the sound, no noise reduction, filtering, or eq.

Ethiopian Popular and Folk Music (Tracks prepared by Ato Girma Zande, Music Librarian, Radio Ethiopia) 

I don't think any of these tracks are on the many reissues of classic Ethiopian music that have been released in the last twenty years.  Don't hesitate to point out releases that I may have missed or to share what you know about these recordings. 
  

The first picture is taken from a Menelik Wessanachew record sleeve and the second from a Bahta Gibrehewot sleeve.   Enjoy.





Askale Berhane - 01 - Gojja Minja (2:19)
Bezunesh Bekele - 02 - Era Mela Mela (3:38)
Uncredited - 03 - Mandjar (from Shoa Province) (3:21)
Uncredited - 04 - Temesgen (from Tigre) (5:45)

Bahta Gibre-Hewot with Ras Band - 05 - Anchem Indela (3:33)
Bahta Gibre-Hewot with Ras Band - 06 - Tar New (1:17)
Bahta Gibre-Hewot with Ras Band - 07 - Ine Nenj Woy Monj (2:50)
Bahta Gibre-Hewot with Ras Band - 08 - Ene Metch Alkuna (2:22)

Bezunesh Bekele & Imperial Body Guard Orchestra - 09 - Ere Keyete Meta (2:58)
Bezunesh Bekele & Imperial Body Guard Orchestra - 10 - Ante Temeta Ene (live) (2:28)
Bezunesh Bekele & Imperial Body Guard Orchestra - 11 - Yaleb Lay Esat (5:59)
Bezunesh Bekele & Imperial Body Guard Orchestra - 12 - Kante Gara Lehun (2:25)

Telahun Gessesse - 13 - Satwadenj Wodeyet (4:18)
Telahun Gessesse - 14 - Ere Min Yeshalengal (2:22)
Telahun Gessesse - 15 - Feker Lebichaye (4:10)

Menelik Wossenachew & Haile Selassie Orchestra - 16 - Yayne Alem (3:41)
Menelik Wossenachew & Haile Selassie Orchestra - 17 - Tez Teyengalesh (3:55)
Menelik Wossenachew & Haile Selassie Orchestra - 18 - Almaz Eyasebbhush (4:40)
Menelik Wossenachew & Haile Selassie Orchestra - 19 - Yehagre Tezeta (2:23)




Monday, January 1, 2018

Menelik Wossenachew - 7'' tracks [ethiopia]
















1. Menelik Wossenachew - Belew Bedubaye (4:02)
2. Menelik Wossenachew - Wusheten New yalkut (6:58)
3. Menelik Wossenachew - Chereka (3:14)
4. Menelik Wossenachew - Mekaberene Liyew (3:31)
5. Menelik Wossenachew - Yeayne Tesfa (6:35)











Wednesday, December 27, 2017

v.a. - Mitmitta Musika [ethiopia]









         Entire contet of this page is taken from Tumblr webpage of guy named DJ Mitmitta, or Kidus Berhanu or Vemund Hareide as he is titled in his Norwegian passport, and this blog post (from december 2013).



           He is true archaelogist of ethiopian vinyl and cassette releases and his devotion to rare ethiopian music is unique.






DJ Mitmitta



Curiosity and frustration can take you far. It has for Kidus Berhanu. Better known as DJ Mitmitta or Vemund Hareide as he is titled in his Norwegian passport, these virtues have taken him all the way from Oslo to the Ethiopian countryside. For Kidus, it all started with a frustration with the uniformity of Western music. A frustration that fed his curiosity to discover the yet undiscovered musical treasures of Ethiopia and led to a commitment to archive and spread the joy of Ethiopian music. This has since materialized in countless travels across the country to collect cassettes with traditional Ethiopian music and the Ethiojazz of the 60s and 70s, and in the founding of Mitmitta Music Shop in 2010 (The shop is currently closed but Kidus is hoping to reopen in a few months at a new location in town.)

This is a journey not unlike others. Awesome Tapes’ Brian Shimkovitz, Sahels Sounds’ Christopher Kirkley and labels such as Soundway, Analog Africa and Sublime Frequencies have embarked on similar voyages. But what distinguish the musical odyssey of Kidus is not only its East African focus. It is also its material character and the focus on the local market opposed to international distribution. For Kidus, the modus operandi has not been spreading the music through a blog nor through reissuing old vinyl records. Not yet. The approach has instead been one of collecting, cataloguing and digitalizing.

The Archaeology of Cassettes 


More than anything, Kidus’ project is an endeavor into musical archaeology and ethnography. And it’s a project focused on and redeemed through tapes (his cassette collection now numbers more than a thousand different Ethiopian tapes). As he explains: “Vinyl is hyped. And tapes are still a popular format. In Ethiopia, a lot of the good old music was never issued on vinyl or on CD.”  However, the predominance of cassettes also makes Kidus’ point to one of several caveats in the music industry and to an irony in his own project. Because while the cassette is his preferred format, it was exactly the spread of the cassette in the late 70’s and onwards that exterminated numerous record labels in Ethiopia and on the rest of continent and gave way for cheaper productions and musicians being replaced by a single synthesizer.

In Ethiopia, the record producers and music shop owners could buy one master tape and then easily duplicate this via cheap blank tapes. An early form of musical piracy that resulted in low quality recordings, unduly low prices and a situation where great Ethiopian artists such as Tilahun Gessesse or Mahmoud Ahmed received only a one-off payment and no benefits of potential future distributions. This however can possibly change with the introduction of a new copyright law in Ethiopia in 2010 that led to many music-shop owners being jailed for copying music for piracy purposes.











Ethiopian Music as off-limit for Ethiopians


Another and somewhat bizarre consequence of the functioning of the Ethiopian music industry prior to the 2010 copyright legislation is that today only very few Ethiopians have access to legal copies of the old Ethiopian recordings. Alemayehu Eshete, Muluken Mellese, Getachew Kassa and other of the artist that have become globally renowned through the Ethiopiques series are simply not legally accessible for the majority of Ethiopians.


Kidus is hoping this will change. He spends lots of time nagging the distributors to re-distribute their old releases, trying to convince them that these records will sell again. The problem is often that the covers are out of print and to make it profitable for distributors they would need to reprint at least 1-2000 covers. But his mission of making Ethiopian music available for both the foreign and the Ethiopian music audience does not stop here. He will soon be releasing a recording of Amharic wedding music from 1973 on both cassette AND vinyl. At the same time he dreams of expanding the geographical focus of his work by collecting, sustaining and distributing old Eritrean, Somali and Sudanese music.







Aster Aweke & Wubishet Fisseha





The Regionalization of Ethiopian music


While music from the rest of Africa has a strong appeal to Kidus, there is and will probably never be something quite like the tunes of Ethiopia for him. After spending part of his childhood in Ethiopia, he returned to Addis briefly as a teenager. The past few years he has spent travelling back and forth between Norway and Ethiopia, between studies, work and cassette hunting. He now spends most of his time in Ethiopia and is fluent in Amharic, the official Ethiopian language. His fascination of Ethiopian music has several roots, as he describes: “The Ethiopians really value their music and even today Ethiopian music is closely linked to the cultural traditions of the country. In addition, the great variation in the music of Ethiopia’s different regions really appeals to me.”

The vast regional difference in Ethiopian musical tradition is something that also poses a challenge to his ethno-musical investigations. The best music of Tigray or Oromiya is not found in Addis but in the music shops in provincial Ethiopia. Kidus highlights the Tzeta music shop in Dessie and the Negarit shop in Dire Dawa as the best music shops outside and the places to find respectively old Tigray, Amhara and Oromo music. He further explains the initial reception of the old music shop owners when a young pale Scandinavian walks into their domain and asks for cassettes with old – and for many Ethiopian also forgotten – artists: “At first they are quite suspicious. But quickly suspicion turns into excitement and appreciation. Mutual appreciation of and gratitude for a joint effort to preserve an important heritage.” 



The Faranji Connoisseur

Many of these grand old men of Ethiopian music – collectors, producers and music shop owners – have since become close friends of Kidus. And Kidus himself has become a renowned connoisseur of Ethiopian music. The go-to-guy for advice and expertise on the music and the music scene of Ethiopia. A position very few faranjis (meaning foreigners in Amharic) can credibly claim. And not an easy position to achieve taking into consideration the relative isolation of Ethiopia and its music during the past century. Nevertheless, Kidus still sees himself as a foreigner in Ethiopia and its music industry and he is aware of the challenges that this poses to him.

Although the emphasis in Kidus’ efforts has mainly on the Ethiopian artists of the past, he has also witnessed on first-hand the changes in the contemporary music scene in Addis (link to Jazzamba article). Changes of both the encouraging and less positive kind. The revival of Ethiojazz has led to an explosion of live music in Addis the last few years: “All clubs want their own band now and there is a lot of talent out there, which is good. Unfortunately, many of the new bands are afraid of experimenting. This is also the case for many of the European or American bands that have started playing Ethiojazz. Many of them are simply trying to copy the success of Mulatu Astatke.” 






Umar Suleeyman



        There are of course exemptions to this trend and Kidus points to the Nubian Arc as one of the most experimental and forward-looking bands around (see further recommendations from Kidus below).

       Kidus concludes by highlighting a more remarkable effect of the renewed interest in Ethiopian music. According to Kidus the new golden era of Ethiopian music has substantially changed the image of Ethiopia and provided the outside world with a new impression of what Ethiopia is in cultural terms. And Kidus is here to make sure that the insight of foreigners and Ethiopians into the unique musical treasures of Ethiopia will grow and proliferate for years to come.





01 - Aster Aweke & Wubishet Fisseha - Gum Gum (7:11)
02 - Teferra Kassa (3:47)
03 - Frew Hailu (4:15)
04 - Mullumebet Mishel (3:49)
05 - Muhammed Awel (8:24)
06 - Ali Mohammed Birra - Siwaamu Hin Awwaattu (5:09)
07 - Ali Mohammed Birra - Hammalelee Acoustic (5:44)
08 - Aster Aweke - Ante Ledj (8:10)
09 - Umar Suleeyman (5:06)
10 - Ayalew Mesfin (3:20)
11 - Muluken Melese (7:28)
12 - Besrat Hailu & Itiyopia Girma Mariam with 
        Eritrea Police Orchestra - Ashagedaw (4:22)
13 - Ali Shebo (6:32)
14 - Abetew Kebede - Chimchim Gonna (5:23)
15 - Umar Suleeyman - Bilisumma (4:37)
16 - Ali Mohammed Birra - Yaboontuu (5:24)
17 - Halo Dawe - Yashola Leki (5:39)
18 - Umar Alii Faarah - Loshee Intala (5:02)
19 - Omar Souleyman (7:22)
20 - Cut Chemist - Adidas to Addis (2:53)
21 - Cut Chemist - Track 2 (9:26)
22 - Brothers Stereo Jigjiga - Hadagan Nimcooy (6:25)
23 - Umar Alii Faarah - Ajaba Bontuu Oromo (5:14)
24 - Alemayehu Eshete (5:29)
25 - Wollo Lalibela Kinet (3:27)
26 - Osman Sayem aka. EthioJazz - Kelemwa (0:53)




Wednesday, December 6, 2017

Colonel Lemma Demissew - 7 songs [ethiopia]











          One of the most successful musicians of the 1970s and 80s Colonel Lemma Demissew has died at the age of 68 on Saturday, August 24th 2009. A pianist, composer, singer and arranger, Lemma was the leading musician of Armed Forces band, a band that has entertained the army and visiting heads of states for decades. Among his appreciative audiences were Fidel Castro of Cuba, Libya’s Muammar al-Qaddafi and the Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak.

        His songs such as “Astawesalehu” “Adrashas Tefabegn” and “Des Balagnalech” are still popular hits. Lemma also maintains reputation for arranging many of Mahmoud Ahmed’s and Alemayehu Eshete anthological vinyl records.







Lemma Demissew - አስታዉሳለሁ ( Astawsalehu )





          Born in Welisso in 1940, Lemma studied high school at Hailemaryam Mamo Secondary High School in Debre Birhan town and at the age of 15 joined the music section of the Armed Forces. There among other things he taught himself to play clarinet. Lemma impressed his superiors with his unique vocal style, demonstrating both outstanding range and the influences of western music. During his time in the Armed Forces, he has taken many musical courses, including a six-year-training in conducting in Soviet Union.

        Lemma has composed a number of official army songs by frequently abandoning the traditional rules and disciplines. He created new harmonies and pioneered new musical forms in which to present his musical ideas. Part of his success was the result of his mastery of the pleasant, tuneful style of piano. The single “Astawesalehu Mech Eresalehu” was his first hit and his talent for melodious, sentimental ballads became his most distinguishing feature. This music remains Lemma signature work and a favorite hit on local radio stations.

          Starting as simple soldier in 1974 he became an army commander and conductor of the roving marshal band. His advancement was rapid. His personal charm and his artistic abilities were partly responsible for his rapid advancement in the army.

       When Lemma resigned in 1993 after the army was disbanded, he was colonel. Even after that, he was much sought as a piano teacher by many, and his long list of students was a roster of the young and the old.






Lemma Demissew - ሰው መሳይ ሾካኮች  (Sew Mesay Shokakoch)





            In May 2009 when the Alliance Ethio-Francise organized the 8th Ethiopian Music Festival has chosen to honor Lemma and Sahle Dagago, another notable arranger and composer who is at present in poor health. Comparing it with Sahel Degago, Francis Falsetto described Lemma’s music as a feverish modernist, deeply inspired by the electric wave born on the other side of the Atlantic Ocean.

       Getachew Debalqe, a renowned stage personality, described Lemma as a hardworking and diligent musician. Getachew told Addis Journal that he was able visit Lemma two days before his demise. “I was lucky to be able to see him on Thursday. He didn’t say much but was able to utter some words.” Lemma had a stroke few years ago that has left him paralyzed.


            Bahata Gebrehiwot, a musician of Lemma‘s era, said Lemma was a great musician. “He has had a tremendous musical achievement yet remained very modest and reserved.” Bahta remarked though Lemma was able to lead his family autonomously, he hasn’t much of financial fortunes. “Like many other musicians, he hasn’t made much use of his music and hasn’t got the recognition he deserved,” says Bahta.





Lemma Demissew - 01 - Adrashash Tefabegn (2:52)
Lemma Demissew - 02 - Almaz enqu mesay (3:48)
Lemma Demissew - 03 - Astawesalehu (4:05)
Lemma Demissew - 04 - Konjo Lij Ayiche (4:05)
Lemma Demissew - 05 - Kulun Man Kualeshe (6:37)
Lemma Demissew - 06 - Kurtun Negerygn (2:05)
Lemma Demissew - 07 - Lezelalem Nuri (2:30)





Friday, November 10, 2017

v.a. - Ethiopian Hit Parade Volume 1 [1972] [ethiopia]












Abbèbè Tèssèmma - Ashasha bèyèw


















































Alèmayèhu Eshèté - 01 - Addis Abeba Bete (4:33)
Girma Bèyènè - 02 - Sét alamenem (5:28)
Gèmètchu Itana - 03 - Shemèrmari tiya (4:31)
Sèyfu Yohannès - 04 - Tezeta (5:21)
Abaynèh Dèdjèné - 05 - Yèbèrèha lomi (3:33)
Tèshomè Meteku - 06 - Gara ser nèw bétesh (3:15)
Menelik Wèsnatchèw - 07 - Asha gèdawo (4:26)
Muluqèn Mèllèssè - 08 - Hédètch Alu (5:17)
Mulatu Astatqé - 09 - Yèkèrmo Sèw (4:15)
Essatu Tèssèmma - 10 - Ayamaru Eshèté (4:00)
Abbèbè Tèssèmma - 11 - Ashasha bèyèw (3:35)






Saturday, July 15, 2017

Belaynesh Wubante & Assegedetch Asfaw - Alemiye / Gubiliye ... and ... Belaynesh Wubante & Assegedetch Asfaw - Ereye Demamu/Belayiye / Sabiye [1974] [ethiopia] FLAC












Belaynesh Wubante & Assegedetch Asfaw :    Alemiye / Gubiliye

Philips PH 214 A

Belaynesh Wubante & Assegedetch Asfaw: Alemiye – Amharic
Arranged by Mulatu Astatke

Philips PH 214 B

Belaynesh Wubante & Assegedetch Asfaw: Gubiliye – Amharic
Arranged by Mulatu Astatke


Year: 1974 

Record pressed in Nairobi, Kenya by East African Records Ltd.





   Mulatu Astatke feat. Belaynesh Wubante and Assegedetch Asfaw - Alemiye   



-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------











Belaynesh Wubante & Assegedetch Asfaw:  Ereye Demamu/Belayiye / Sabiye


Philips PH 213 A

Belaynesh Wubante & Assegedetch Asfaw: Ereye Demamu/Belayiye – Amharic
Arranged by Mulatu Astatke


Philips PH 213 B

Belaynesh Wubante & Assegedetch Asfaw: Sabiye – Amharic
Written by Belaynesh / Assegedetch 
Arranged by Mulatu Astatke



Year: 1974 
Record pressed in Nairobi, Kenya by East African Records Ltd.



Wednesday, June 28, 2017

Ketema Mekonnen - Ketema 70's [ethiopia]













Ketema Mekonnen - Tizita






Ketema Mekonnen - 01 - Ambasel [with Massinko] (3:38)
Ketema Mekonnen - 02 - Ambasel [with Kirar] (4:40)
Ketema Mekonnen - 03 - Arada (3:28)
Ketema Mekonnen - 04 - Bati (2:53)
Ketema Mekonnen - 05 - Bemela Besebeb (3:09)
Ketema Mekonnen - 06 - Derbaba (3:21)
Ketema Mekonnen - 07 - Endegena (3:05)
Ketema Mekonnen - 08 - Ene Eshaleshalehu (2:40)
Ketema Mekonnen - 09 - Ere Endemin Alesh (1:05)
Ketema Mekonnen - 10 - Gedaye Gedaye (3:25)
Ketema Mekonnen - 11 - Layne Rakshebigne (3:23)
Ketema Mekonnen - 12 - Shemonmoanaye Wa (3:41)
Ketema Mekonnen - 13 - Tey Geday (3:17)
Ketema Mekonnen - 14 - Tizita [with Acordion] (3:54)
Ketema Mekonnen - 15 - Tizita [with Kirar] (3:18)
Ketema Mekonnen - 16 - Tizita [with Massinko] (6:43)





Tuesday, June 27, 2017

Asnaketch Worku and Ketema Mekonen - Asnakech and Ketema [ethiopia]














Asnaketch Worku and Ketema Mekonen - Yewolo tizita





Asnaketch Worku and Ketema Mekonen - 01 - Gende desi (4:56)
Asnaketch Worku and Ketema Mekonen - 02 - Yewelo tizeta (5:34)
Asnaketch Worku and Ketema Mekonen - 03 - Alber ende amora (5:32)
Asnaketch Worku and Ketema Mekonen - 04 - Teymenew (5:47)
Asnaketch Worku and Ketema Mekonen - 05 - Mela mela (8:07)
Asnaketch Worku and Ketema Mekonen - 06 - Arada (6:55)
Asnaketch Worku and Ketema Mekonen - 07 - Wegenea (6:00)
Asnaketch Worku and Ketema Mekonen - 08 - Ehile bele (5:38)
Asnaketch Worku and Ketema Mekonen - 09 - Kibret alem (4:26)
Asnaketch Worku and Ketema Mekonen - 10 - Sabiyea (4:34)
Asnaketch Worku and Ketema Mekonen - 11 - Gusumayea (3:27)